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    nmw 18:45:11 on 2015/01/11 Permalink
    Tags: happiness, , , , , metric, metrics,   

    Money Doesn’t Make Us Happy 

    Many people seem to make some kind of logical mistake (I wish I knew more fancy latin names for the type of logical errors people make in their reasoning — then I could perhaps add a neato phrase here to impress people).

    Obviously, people want to be happy. There are some things many people believe will make them happy — and since many people believe that, the demand for such things is generally quite large. Since the demand for such things is quite large (and since such things are also quite often in limited supply), it is quite common for their market price to be high enough to give those people who want these popularly demanded objects the impression that they need money to get these things (and therefore also that they need money to become happy).

    I do not doubt that quite a few people who are reading this are thinking to themselves “oh, but you do need money to buy food and a roof over your head”. Note that I never said you don’t… — and the reason why I didn’t say that is mainly because I don’t want to argue that point (though I feel like I could, I find it far simpler to simply point out that the amount of money actually needed for survival is quite small… indeed: so small that I consider it to be negligible [perhaps with the possible exception of some life-threatening medical conditions]). Yet again I digress from the main point….

    The main point is that money and happiness are (in my humble opinion) definitely not interchangeable measures — to think that to measure happiness, you could simply measure money instead is undoubtedly a gross error.

     
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    nmw 14:10:51 on 2014/10/09 Permalink
    Tags: , Categorical Imperative, , collabortive, , , cooperation, cooperative, , dystopia, dystopian, economic development, , , , , happiness, , Immanuel Kant, , , , Kant, , , , , , , , , , , utopia, utopian,   

    Kant’s Big Mistake? 

    In my previous post I referred to Kant’s “Categorical Imperative”. Here, let me entertain the following suggestion: That Kant made a big mistake.

    Kant wrote a lot. If he was consistent in his thinking, that would mean that he wanted everyone to write a lot. Now since he lived several hundred years ago, Kant never had to face the prospect of having to read dozens, hundreds, thousands or even millions of volumes of text, with rarely one of them rising above the level of completely ephemeral blather (in my opinion, this is primarily due to how the coincidence of copyright law and mass production of printed paper had not yet taken its course into its swirling destiny of mind-numbing confusion). Had Kant ever envisioned the world we live in today, he would have probably immediately had a heart attack and died on the spot right then and there.

    There is some irony to how my main goal in life is something quite similar to making this frightening, horrific vision actually come true — but to do so in a way that might satisfy the hopes and dreams of literate people everywhere. One of the main reasons why I am so focused on literacy is that I do not feel that publishing hogwash improves anything anywhere (except, perhaps, for people who “make money” that way — and in particular only insofar as it fulfills their financial obsession and their fetish for cash).

    Yet I feel optimistic enough to believe that everyone is particularly literate at something… — what’s your thing?

     
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    nmw 08:52:20 on 2014/10/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , existential, , happiness, , , inspirational, inspirationals, inspirations, inspire   

    Go Inspire Yourself! 

    Seeking inspiration outside of yourself is problematical.

    One of my inspirations has a habit of referring to something as “Kantian” — referring to using any maxim as if it were a universal law. If everyone wished to be inspired by someone else, then the burden of being the last in the line of expectations would be rather heavy. Likewise, attempting to inspire others seems doomed to fail due to the often quite shallow depths of intellectual resources available. :|

    How to escape from this quasi-conundrum?

    There are no easy answers to this problem, but here is one idea: Immortalize yourself! Live in a way that has no expectation of a future, no sorrows or regrets about the past — neither of them exist here and now. You will not become anything, you will not receive a reward, you will not find the truth. Simply exist and enjoy yourself in the present. :)

     
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